What is the rarest blood type | What County

What is the rarest blood type

Donating blood is always a trump card! And the ace of hearts in the world of blood groups is called: zero negative. This blood group is always desperately needed. Basically, the needs of the individual blood groups depend on how they are distributed spatially and, above all, how they get along with each other. The decisive factor in the case of a blood transfusion – that is, if a patient receives blood from another person – is that the blood type and rhesus factor of the donor and recipient must be coordinated. Only then will the transfusion succeed without complications for the recipient.

rarest blood type
rarest blood type

Blood types are not equally common worldwide. The differences are considerable depending on the continent and in some cases even in a country comparison. The rarest blood group in the world is AB with the rhesus factor negative. It has only 1% of the population worldwide as well as in Germany. Most people worldwide have blood group 0 with the Rhesus factor positive, which corresponds to 36% and 35% of the population in Germany. The blood group A with the Rhesus factor positive is represented worldwide with 28% and Germany-wide with 37%. The blood group B with the Rhesus factor positive is owned by 21% of people worldwide and only 9% of people in Germany. At 6%, blood group A with the Rhesus factor negative is represented in Germany, and blood group B with the rhesus factor negative is possessed by only 2% of people in Germany.

What is the rarest blood type
What is the rarest blood type

The blood group AB with the Rhesus factor positive is represented worldwide with 5% and 4% in Germany. An equally low occurrence, with 4% of the world’s population and 6% in Germany, has the blood group 0 with the Rhesus factor negative.

Consequently, especially people with this blood group are welcome donors. They are also called “universal donors”, since their blood can be received by people with all other blood groups. As patients, on the other hand, people with zero negative tolerate only their own blood group and are therefore dependent on zero Rhesus negative donor blood. In contrast, people with the AB blood group and the Rhesus factor also tolerate all other blood groups positively – they are thus considered a “universal recipient”. If necessary, blood of groups A, B and 0 can also be transferred to them.

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