What is Polio | What County

What is Polio

Polio or polio – abbreviated for poliomyelitis anterior acuta or spinal poliomyelitis – is a highly contagious acute infectious disease with the polio virus.

The term poliomyelitis was derived from the Greek words for “gray (polios)” and “marrow”, since the viruses mainly affect parts of the so-called gray spinal cord substance, which can lead to permanent paralysis.

What is Polio
What is Polio
Polio
Polio

Contrary to what the German term suggests, not only children, but also adults can get sick. The name polio originated because the disease was so widespread worldwide until the 1960s that contact with the pathogen already took place in childhood, usually before the age of five. The last major wave of the disease occurred in 1960/1961 with more than 9,000 registered cases of paralysis in the Federal Republic of Germany. As a result, in 1962, a major vaccination campaign was launched in the Federal Republic under the motto “Swallow vaccination is sweet – polio is cruel”, while systematic vaccinations were successfully started in the GDR as early as 1960.

In Germany, polioviruses were last imported in 1992 – from Egypt and India. In Germany, poliomyelitis is a disease that must be reported according to the Infection Protection Act.

What does polio do to a person?
What caused polio?
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Does polio still exist today?

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