What is a Biopsy | What County

What is a Biopsy

A biopsy is the taking of “samples” (e.g. tissue, fluids) from the human body. This is done, on the one hand, by the introduction of a hollow needle over the surface of the skin and puncture of organs, tissues or cavities, on the other hand, by endoscopic or surgical intervention. Often, depending on the location and depth, imaging methods such as ultrasound, CT and MRI are used to plan and perform the puncture.

What is a Biopsy
What is a Biopsy
Biopsy
Biopsy

A biopsy is used to distinguish between benign, malignant or inflammatory altered tissue. With the help of the biopsy, changes at the cellular level in organs can be detected and accurately classified by the pathologist. Biopsies are required to clarify tumor-suspicious findings, e.g. in the mammary gland, thyroid gland, lungs, liver, kidney, stomach, intestines, lymph nodes, soft tissues and bones. The result of the biopsy is a decisive criterion for further treatment and the prognosis of the patient.

In certain inflammatory diseases or in cancer, symptomatic fluid accumulation (eg, seroma, effusion, abscess, malignant effusion) can occur in the cavities of the human body (abdominal cavity, chest cavity). With the help of a targeted puncture, tissue fluid can be sucked off and obtained for further examination, or treated via drainage.

How painful is a biopsy?
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What is the purpose of a biopsy?
What can be diagnosed with a biopsy?

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